Foster Questions

Fostering Questions

Fostering is one of the biggest ways you can help a dog in need. It's a win for everyone. On the one hand, it gives you the opportunity to help a dog that is in dire need of a second chance. On the other hand, it also gives us a unique ability to determine what the dog actually needs when it finds it's furever home. Check out some of these FAQ's written by an actual foster parent...

Foster Bonds

How do you do it? How do you give a foster dog up? How do you not keep them all?
This is our most commonly asked fostering question when polled. Most of our fosters stated that they'd rather be a little sad when one of the furkids left, than be even more upset knowing that many more will die for lack of a foster home.

What if I decide I can't live without this dog?
In some cases you may have what we jokingly call a "foster failure." That means that you failed fostering by letting the dog become a permanent family member. Many of our long-term foster homes have at least one foster failure. Have no fear, it's normal!

Protocols & Inputs

Will I get to meet the potential adopters?
Absolutely! We not only want you to meet the family, we depend on hearing your input as to whether this would be a good fit for your foster dog. If you do not feel that it's a good fit, we will weigh that in with our decision making process. In addition, many of our former fosters continue to get updates, emails, pictures and sometimes even visits with their former foster dogs.

How long do foster dogs tend to stay?
This is a difficult question to answer. Adult dogs typically are in a foster home for approximately 2 months on average. Puppies and some specific breeds tend to get adopted faster than others.

What if I only want to foster smaller dogs or certain breeds?
That's just fine! Typically you'll be emailed a list of available dogs and you can notify us of who you'd like to foster. In some cases you may be asked about fostering a specific dog. If you opt to be breed specific, you may be asked to be a temporary foster until an alternative solution for a dog in emergency need can be placed in a more long term foster situation.

What else is expected of me?
Everything (kind of, but not really...) If it's possible, bringing the dog to adoption events is a big plus. It helps expose the dog to potential adopters. Also any help you can provide with fundraising events is appreciated - our events can be big, and it takes our awesome volunteers to make them a reality.

Foster Care

What if my foster dog gets sick?
We have several vets that we work with. We do ask that foster dogs go to these vets. In the case of an emergency that occurs after normal business hours, please utilize an emergency vet care facility. The president of the organization must be notified as soon as possible.

Who covers the costs of routine vet visits?
The rescue pays for routine vet visits, including:
  • Heartworm preventative & treatment
  • Flea & tick preventative
  • Vaccinations
Preventative is used and required on all rescue dogs from March thru November.

Who pays for food?
The foster home provides food and love. We are unable to cover total costs of food. If the dog requires a special diet, K9 Kindness will attempt to help the foster home cover these costs.

What if I have cats or other pets?
We will make every attempt to make sure that your foster dog will do well with your other pets. However, things do happen and if there is an unforeseen problem, we will try to get your foster dog into another foster home as quickly as possible.

What if fostering just doesn't work out?
We will attempt to locate another foster home and move the dog as soon as we can. Please understand that fostering is voluntary, and finding another foster home is not something that may happen over night in some cases.
If you don't see a question answered here you can either opt to go back or to contact us for more information.